होम Notes and Queries The buckland yew

The buckland yew

यह पुस्तक आपको कितनी अच्छी लगी?
फ़ाइल की गुणवत्ता क्या है?
पुस्तक की गुणवत्ता का मूल्यांकन करने के लिए यह पुस्तक डाउनलोड करें
डाउनलोड की गई फ़ाइलों की गुणवत्ता क्या है?
खंड:
CXLIX
भाषा:
english
पत्रिका:
Notes and Queries
DOI:
10.1093/nq/CXLIX.dec26.466a
Date:
December, 1925
फ़ाइल:
PDF, 120 KB
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अपनी समीक्षा पोस्ट करने के लिए साइन इन करें या साइन अप करें
आप पुस्तक समीक्षा लिख सकते हैं और अपना अनुभव साझा कर सकते हैं. पढ़ूी हुई पुस्तकों के बारे में आपकी राय जानने में अन्य पाठकों को दिलचस्पी होगी. भले ही आपको किताब पसंद हो या न हो, अगर आप इसके बारे में ईमानदारी से और विस्तार से बताएँगे, तो लोग अपने लिए नई रुचिकर पुस्तकें खोज पाएँगे.
1

Booksellers' catalogues

साल:
1925
भाषा:
english
फ़ाइल:
PDF, 135 KB
2

The buckland yew

साल:
1925
भाषा:
english
फ़ाइल:
PDF, 208 KB
466

NOTES AND QUERIES.

H. HANXEX.

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which I live in Kent, not many years ago,
about a dozen elms, so far as I remember,
averaging 50 feet in height, were successfully
moved several hundred yards.
A long account of the removal of the yew
at Buckland will be found in vol. i. of ' The
Kentish Note Book,' pp. 199-203.

DECKHRKB 26,-1925.

CHILDREN'S
DRESS:
HISTORY
^ WANTED (cxlix. 333, 406, 428). —
Further information might be obtained from
the old Blue-coat School, Hertford, above the
door of which are models of two girls and
two boys in stone.
At Bottisham (Cambs) is a mural plaque,
showing a child in a green costume, with
white choker, red stockings and black boots.
The anils are extended, the left hand holding
an open book and the right a circular, green
hat.
This is evidently the costume of the
recipients of a charity, for, beneath the
whole appears the following :
I was naked and ye clothed me. Built and

According to ' The Trees of Great Britain
and Ireland,' by Ehves and Henry (1906), the
yew-tree is easy to transplant in early
autumn or in spring, and may be safely
moved at almost any time of the year, even
when of large size, if care is taken to prepare the roots and keep them watered until
new ones are formed.
The yew in Buckland founded by Sir ROGER JEXYNS, Anno. 1730.
Churchyard is mentioned as an instance of
Sir Roger was an occupant of Bottisham
the great age at which this tree may be trans- Hall.
planted with safety.
The account states : •
A. L. Cox.
That this tree was a very old and large one, ! Metheringhaui, Lines.
divided into two stems, one of which, almost ! CREST FOR IDENTIFICATION (cxlix.
horizontal, was 10 feet 10 inches, and the ^ 404, 449).—The marks on the spoon menentire trunk no less than 22 feet in girth. It 1
was removed by the late Mr. W. Barron on tioned by A. R. are probably : (1) S. ; (2)
March 1st, 1880, to a position 60 yards off, Crowned Harp;  ; (3) Hibernia ; (4) Royal
where Mr. John Barron, of Elyaston Nur- ; head; (5) R. W. and M. West.
As the
suries, tells me it is now in a vigorous state i royal head looks to the right, these marks
of health. An account of this tree is given by : seem only to suit the year 1813-4. They are
Lowe; and the manner in which it was transplanted, with pictures of its appearance before ' the Dublin marks of that year. (See Cripp's
and after removal, is described fully in Gard. • 'Old English P l a t e ' ) .
Cliron.; 1880, p. 556-7.
A. D. T.
ABCHIBAI/D SPAEKE.
CONG ON ABRAHAM NEWLAND (cxlix.
Buckland Parish Church was further en- °
352, 395).—The different versions of this
larged in 1880.
The nave was extended by song shew a variation in wording, and in
adding three more arches, 250 additional sit- some versions there are six verses.
There
tings were provided, at a cost of £2,000. are at least two musical settings, one of which
The great expense was partly due to the fact was published a t Rhames's, 16, Exchange
that the historic yew-tree at the west end Street, Dublin, and was sung by " Mr. Davis
had to be- removed sixty feet westward to at Astley's Amphitheatre," and the other
make room for the extension.
The tree, I was " printed and sold by H. Hime, of 14,
which is supposed to be a thousand years old, Castle Street, Liverpool" (price Is.), and
has maintained its vitality in the new situ- 1 was sung by Mr. Johannot.
The composers
ation, and is now more than ever an object ! of these tunes are not indicated on the copies
of curiosity.
(Jones's ' Annals of Dover'). in my hands, but the second version is stated
ALFRED SYDNEY L E W I S ,
, to be the same author as " the favorite
Librarian.
Song of the Grinder." The words were written by C. Dibdin, Junior.
Constitutional Club, W.C.
T ETTERS AT T H E CANDLE (cxlviii. ! Abraham Newland was in the service of the
457). — The following passage would I Bank of England from 1748 to 1807, and
seem to indicate how this name has come to was Chief Cashier for nearly thirty years
be applied to " the fungoid parcels about the of that period.
wicks" :
W. MARSTON ACRES.
A bright spark in the candle betokens the A LONDON C O F F E E - H O U S E , .XVTI
coming of a letter; if it drops on the first •ft- CENTURY (cxlix. 225, 267).—There
shake, the letter is already in the post.— was a coffee-house in 1720, known as " WagWm. Henderson. 'Notes on the Folk-Lore of
the Northern Counties of England and the horne's Coffee House," near the Court of
Requests at Westminster, where it seems to
Borders/ 1ST9, p. 111.
have been customary for Members of ParliaOSO Y AtCANTOKADA.