होम Notes and Queries Author of quotation wanted

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यह पुस्तक आपको कितनी अच्छी लगी?
फ़ाइल की गुणवत्ता क्या है?
पुस्तक की गुणवत्ता का मूल्यांकन करने के लिए यह पुस्तक डाउनलोड करें
डाउनलोड की गई फ़ाइलों की गुणवत्ता क्या है?
खंड:
183
भाषा:
english
पत्रिका:
Notes and Queries
DOI:
10.1093/nq/183.2.59c
Date:
July, 1942
फ़ाइल:
PDF, 123 KB
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अपनी समीक्षा पोस्ट करने के लिए साइन इन करें या साइन अप करें
आप पुस्तक समीक्षा लिख सकते हैं और अपना अनुभव साझा कर सकते हैं. पढ़ूी हुई पुस्तकों के बारे में आपकी राय जानने में अन्य पाठकों को दिलचस्पी होगी. भले ही आपको किताब पसंद हो या न हो, अगर आप इसके बारे में ईमानदारी से और विस्तार से बताएँगे, तो लोग अपने लिए नई रुचिकर पुस्तकें खोज पाएँगे.
1

Disraeli's novels: Key to characters

साल:
1942
भाषा:
english
फ़ाइल:
PDF, 112 KB
2

"Pistle" or "Pistoll."

साल:
1942
भाषा:
english
फ़ाइल:
PDF, 114 KB
JULY 18,

1942.

Raincom in 1815.
I have been informed that the Royal Liver
Buildings at Liverpool now occupy the sitewhere for it quarter of a c'entuiy the old .£tiiii
came in twelve times each day from Woodside,
Birkenhead. The landing place at Liverpool,
long since filled, in, was the old St. George's
^Dock.
As my photograph shows, she had one
paddlewheel, in the centre of the vessel,
working in a groove formed by two barge hulls
fitted around the wheel. She is said to have
been at first steered by a tiller, but later on a
larger rudder was fitted, operated by a steering wheel. Her normal speed is said to have
been 7 knots.
Thus it would appear that the /Etna was
engaged on a regular shore >to shore service
after the longer up-river voyages to Runcorn.
I have been given to understand that her
regular ferry service from Woodiside was
from 1816 to 1840. The present day RuncornWidnes transporter bridge fulfils the function
of communication -.vith Lancashire at the
quarter near Runcorn.
Your correspondent expresses surprise that
no history of the Mersey ferries appears to
have been undertaken. However, Mr. Arthur
C. Wardle, in John o' London's Weekly, of
26 July 1940 (p. 475), declared that he was
working upon a history of the Mersey ferries
which he hoped to publish in more propitious
times. I, for one, hope that the result of his
labours may not be long delayed.
BOOK LOVEK.

WANTED (clxxxii. 331).—The lines are
from ' Lars Porsenna,' a parody telling how
S" OURCE
Adolphus Smalls of Boniface " was successful in

his examination for a pass degree. I have a copy
of the original publication, in paper cover, Thos.
Shrimpton and Son, Ox-ford, anonymous, no date.
CLAUD RUSSELL.

The parody appeared in ' College Rhymes,'
1855. It was afterwards issued by Shrimpton of
Oxford for sixpence.
It is printed in Walter
Hamilton's ' Parodies,' vol. v, p. 169.
A. L. HUMPHREYS.

UTHOR OF QUOTATION WANTED (clxxxii.
345): —
"Absence makes the heart grow fonder!
Isle of beauty, fare (hee. well."
This will;  be found in T. H. Bayly's ' Odes to
Rosa: Isle of beauty."

A

•

W M . JAGGARD.

The first seven words are the first line of an
anonymous poem in Davison's '•Poetical Rhapsody,'.1602.
ARCHIBALD SPARKE.

The Library.
Essays anil studies, by Members of the
English Association.
Vol. xxvii.
1941.
(Clarendon Press. 7s. 6d. ne-t) (to members,
5s. net).
^PHE
present volume contains six essays;
A
three are on Lord Herbert of CJierbury, on Lewesdon Hill and its • poet
(William Crowe), and on ' The Nineties.'
Beyond saying that one of these (we do not
say which one) is slight, another informative, and another interesting, we shall say no
more of them. And on the other three we
shall say nothing. We propose to let them
speak for themselves so that our readers may
review them. They will find that if they are
to unravel the intricacy of Mr. C. S. Lewis's
argument (60 far as we let him present it),
whether to accept it or to reject it, they must
be the very reverse of indolent reviewers, and
they will understand how space has not
allowed us to discuss it. And so similarly if
they will puzzle out the consecutiveness of l)v.
K. W. Chapman's two paragraphs, or decide
on the justice of thought in Dr. W. H. D.
Rouse's one.
Mr. C. S. Lewis's subject is " PsychoAnalysis and 'Literary Criticism,'' and he
says in the course of i t :
Trollope has (old us in his ' Autobiography '
that his novels: grew out of what he calls
'" castle-building"
and
makes
the
character
of his early reveries quite clear by adding " 1
myself was of course my own hero." The wishfulfilling function explains why, as he tells us,
" nothing impossible was ever introduced—1 never
became a king or a duke—I never was a learned
man, nor even a philosopher. But I was a very
clever person, and beautiful young women used tcbe fond of me—and altogether I was a very much
better fellow than 1 have ever succeeded in being
since." It is, plainly, a text-book case of the
self-regarding day-dream.
But Trollope significantly adds: " In after years—I have discarded
the hero of my early dreams and have been able
to lay my own identity aside."
This " discarding of the hero " is Trollope's
account of what Freud calls the " elaboration " .
that removes the " grating personal note," and I
do not suppose that I am in disagreement with
psycho-analysis if I say that, even where a work
of art originated in a self-regarding reverie, it
becomes art by ceasing to be what it was. It is
hard to imagine a more radical change than the
disappearance of the self who was, by hypothesis,
the raison d'etre of the original dream. The very
root from which the dream grew is severed and
the dream is planted in a new soil: it is killed as
fantasy before it is raised as art. Two other things
are worth noting. Trollope's work, which admittedly springs from wish-fulfilment, is work of an

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.NOTES AND QUERIES.